Newspaper Buying

Newspaper Buying

Watching the August 6, 2013 PBS News Hour presentation about the sale of The Washington Post newspaper to Mr. Bazos the father of Amazon, the Online retailer, reminded me of my view that fewer people purchase newspapers because fewer people can afford to.

Central to the some 83 odd year ownership and sale of the Post by the Graham family was a clip in which a woman is interviewed saying she no longer subscribes to newspapers; she gets her news Online. This clip appeared before the interview about the Graham family’s selling the paper to Mr. Graham’s 15 year buddy Mr. Bazos of Amazon, and was referred to by Mr Graham to confirm that the Post was having difficulty avoiding financial losses because more people were likely getting their news Online, and not because they had less money for newspaper subscriptions.

So selling the paper to Mr. Bazos seemed to further illustrate that competition with Online digital news was the usual reason print newspapers like the Post were losing readers and money, and so the Washington Post had to be sold to Graham’s old friend Mr. Bazos who better understood the newer electronic world. The Graham family’s apparent competition motives for selling their paper presented in the video clip and the Graham interview is one perspective about the demise of print reading losing to the increasing availability of Online news. But since business loss appears central to this sale and not better news coverage: free electronic news rather than directly purchased print news subscriptions, my view that papers are making less money because fewer people can afford subscriptions remains.

In a sense the decline of print and the rise of Online information may appear both coincidental, and perhaps causal, but regardless fewer people have the money to purchase things not necessary for survival. And the prices of all things have been rising for decades while incomes have stagnated for growing numbers of people not of the middle/professional class. The prices of some books have risen astronomically, and now in Canada the sale of books is taxed. Toronto’s Star has just doubled the price of its Thursday and Friday papers. And I recall some 20 years ago I used to purchase The Globe and Mail, Toronto’s most expensive newspaper, on my way to work. About 15 years ago I could not afford the expense. Twenty years ago the latest daily copy of The Globe and Mail used to litter public lounges. I can no longer recall when I last saw a discarded Globe, now priced nearly 10 times what it cost when I used to purchase it on my way to work.
This entry was posted in Economy, Media and tagged Amazon, Bazos, Graham, Newspaper Buying, Online, prices of some books, The Washington Post on August 7, 2013.

Income Gaps

July 28, 2013

I, once not too long ago and even some time ago, said that “impoverishment” had not been an election issue in either the 2011 Canadian federal election when the NDP once considered a socialist party called communists by some became for the first time Canada’s official opposition with the Quebec Bloq’s help, or in the US.”fiscal cliff” president’s race of 2012.

But now Ms. Clinton’s starting early for the 2016 Democrat primary president race saying there’s a gap between the middle classers (professionals ?) and the better off classes that’s hard to ignore like OECD’s gap in Canada between haves & have nots, and Mr. Obama now days in a row in the NY Times hoeing & planting the gap for Ms. Clinton to reap for Democrat middle classers surviving on just $450000. a yr..

And today, August 22, 2013 a NY Times article is announcing that there is a determination among both Democrat and Republican political representatives to limit recent higher than inflation increases in college tuition fees by better supporting those institutions’ whose graduates earn the most money, thus saving money for American taxpayers, and graduates who have accumulated an average twenty-six thousand dollars in debt. Though one of the conditions for high government ranking and support includes the number of poor students enrolled, it is difficult to imagine more than a sprinkling of poor people with adequate pre university schooling who could even dream of taking on the average $26,000 debt for tuition.

Certainly, college tuition is a bipartisan middle class issue that should with other middle/professional class issues dominate political debate for years to come..

The Expanding Gap

August 21, 2013

Two images continue to haunt me: the May, 2013 television image of the beaming President and CEO of Blackberry/RIM introducing the latest Blackberry handsets. The other is a newspaper image of a daycare operator obscured behind the hood of a winter jacket as she is taken into custody by two, more elegantly attired police officers. Approximately 3 months after the May 2013 Blackberry Ltd. announcements and some 17 months after his becoming President and CEO there are media reports of the possible sale of the new Blackberry company with a likely payout to the President and CEO of forty-six million dollars. The hooded little person escorted by police paid fifteen thousand dollars for her freedom before her charge was reduced from second degree murder to negligent homicide. Her apparent crime was the result of a child’s death in her overcrowded daycare facility.

I can’t but guess that the overcrowded daycare facility was a result of its owner trying to bring in as much money as possible in a world where many work two jobs non stop while upper echelon executives rake in what the two job workers and day care operators might consider a fortune, paid to some executives for what their fellow business associates feel is their indispensable managing-marketing image, regardless of how long they are on the job, the value of their company’s stock or how many people they might unemploy.

Fait Accompli/President Morsi is nolonger President

August 16,2013

Amidst references to Egypt’s summer of 2013 political conflict we hear that both the moderates supporting Egypt’s army, and the less than moderate President Morsi supporters believe that the United States is encouraging the other side. These accusations are “reiterated” and dismissed as inaccurate by United States officials. What we do not hear about is how the current political conflict masks a fait accompli: what is done is done. For to the most vocal American, European & UN officials the task now is achieving peace: the end of violence between pro Morsi demonstrators and the military.

President Morsi is no longer president.

August 17,2013August 16,2013

Amidst references to Egypt’s summer of 2013 political conflict we hear that both the moderates supporting Egypt’s army, and the less than moderate President Morsi supporters believe that the United States is encouraging the other side. These accusations are “reiterated” and dismissed as inaccurate by United States officials. What we do not hear about is how the current political conflict masks a fait accompli: what is done is done. For to the most vocal American, European & UN officials the task now is achieving peace: the end of violence between pro Morsi demonstrators and the military.

President Morsi is no longer president.

August 17,2013

New York Times of August 17, 2013 search results at top of page labelled 16 minutes ago, but dated August 16, 2013:

News Analysis

Ties With Egypt Army Constrain Washington

<nyt_byline>

By THOM SHANKER and ERIC SCHMITT

Published: August 16, 2013

…”The violence is intolerable, but clearly they feel the nation of Egypt is facing a sovereign, existential crisis,” said one Obama administration official. “So while the violence is intolerable, we may be able to eventually accept these decisions if the violence ends, and quickly.”….

The above rather coolly contrived statements replete with meaningless jargon such as “sovereign existential crisis” and adjectives of righteous indignation such as “intolerable”(x2) were said by a nameless”Obama” official referred to in an August 17, New York Times article published on August 16 by THOM SHANKER and ERIC SCHMITT. Anyone doubting that the Obama administration has accepted the overthrow of the Egyptian president on July 3, 2013 by a “democratic” army as a fait accompli should parse the unnamed Obama official’s words copied from above. “So while the violence is intolerable, we may be able to eventually accept these decisions if the violence ends, and quickly.”

Ties With Egypt Army Constrain Washington

New York Times (blog) ‎- 35 minutes ago”

New York Times of August 17, 2013 search results at top of page labelled 16 minutes ago, but dated August 16, 2013:

News Analysis

Ties With Egypt Army Constrain Washington

By THOM SHANKER and ERIC SCHMITT

Published: August 16, 2013

…”The violence is intolerable, but clearly they feel the nation of Egypt is facing a sovereign, existential crisis,” said one Obama administration official. “So while the violence is intolerable, we may be able to eventually accept these decisions if the violence ends, and quickly.”….

The above rather coolly contrived statements replete with meaningless jargon such as “sovereign existential crisis” and adjectives of righteous indignation such as “intolerable”(x2) were said by a nameless”Obama” official referred to in an August 17, New York Times article published on August 16 by THOM SHANKER and ERIC SCHMITT. Anyone doubting that the Obama administration has accepted the overthrow of the Egyptian president on July 3, 2013 by a “democratic” army as a fait accompli should parse the unnamed Obama official’s words copied from above. “So while the violence is intolerable, we may be able to eventually accept these decisions if the violence ends, and quickly.”

“Ties With Egypt Army Constrain Washington

New York Times (blog) ‎- 35 minutes ago”

Egypt largest non-OPEC oil producer in Africa

The following statement copied from July 8, 2013 Huffington Post appeared word for word in numerous other Online articles about Egypt’s oil production (as world oil prices rose above $95 a barrel) less than a week after Egypt’s army removed that country’s elected president.

“Egypt is not an oil producer, but its control of the Suez Canal, one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes, gives it a crucial role in maintaining global energy supplies.”

On July 31, 2013 ,however, I received the following information from the

United States Energy Information Administration ( U.S. EIA ):

“While serving as a major transit point for oil and LNG from the Persian Gulf to Europe, Egypt is the largest non-OPEC oil producer in Africa and the second largest dry natural gas producer on the continent.”